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    Skittles & Titanium Dioxide | Are Skittles Okay To Eat?

    Skittles & Titanium Dioxide | Are Skittles Okay To Eat?

    Are Skittles Carcinogenic? Examining the Evidence

     

    A recent report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has raised alarm bells about the potential carcinogenic properties of Skittles candy and other products containing titanium dioxide. While no definitive conclusions can be drawn from this report, it's important to take a closer look at what the research is actually saying and whether we should be worried about consuming products containing titanium dioxide. 

     

     

    What Does the Report Say? 

    The EWG’s report focuses on a study conducted by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles and published in 2017. This study found that mice exposed to high doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles developed tumors at much higher rates than mice who were not exposed. The authors concluded that these findings raise “a red flag for potential cancer-causing activity in humans.” 

     

    Do Skittles have titanium dioxide in them?

    Yes, Skittles contain titanium dioxide, as do many other products such as candy, chewing gum, toothpaste and sunscreen. The FDA has this to say in regards to food products containing Titanium Dioxide: The quantity of titanium dioxide does not exceed 1 percent by weight of the food. (2) It may not be used to color foods for which standards of identity have been promulgated under section 401 of the act unless added color is authorized by such standards. (d) Labeling.

     

    Are Skittles unfit for human consumption?

    At this point, it’s too early to draw any firm conclusions about the safety of Skittles or other products containing titanium dioxide, but skittles are likely still safe to consume in moderation. There is a lack of research on the long-term effects of consuming food and beverages with titanium dioxide. It is worth noting that the mice in the UCLA study were exposed to very high doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, and it is unclear whether the same risks would be present in humans consuming much smaller amounts of the substance. More research needs to be done before any definitive conclusions can be drawn.

     

    What candies have titanium dioxide?

    In addition to Skittles, many other popular candy products contain titanium dioxide. These include M&M's, Twix, Snickers, Milky Way, and Kit Kat bars. Many chewing gums are also made with titanium dioxide, including Orbit and Trident gum. Some toothpastes also contain the substance, such as Colgate Total Advanced Whitening.

     

    Are Skittles okay to eat?

    Ultimately, it's up to each individual consumer to decide if they want to consume products containing titanium dioxide. However, it is important to remember that consuming Skittles or other candies with titanium dioxide should be done in moderation, as there is still some uncertainty surrounding the potential health risks associated with its consumption. Additionally, those who have existing health conditions or allergies should discuss with their doctor before consuming any product with titanium dioxide.

     

    Do Skittles All Taste The Same?

    Have you ever wondered if the different colors of skittles all taste the same? The short answer is no. While all skittles are fruity, each flavor has its own distinct flavor. Skittles come in five fruit flavors: strawberry, orange, lemon, grape and green apple. Each color is associated with a particular flavor and can be distinguished by its unique aroma and taste.

     

    Is Titanium Dioxide Really That Dangerous? 

    It's important to keep in mind that this study used extremely high doses of titanium dioxide—far higher than what you would find in your average bag of Skittles or other food products containing this substance. In fact, most experts agree that there is no evidence to suggest that ingesting small amounts of titanium dioxide poses any kind of health risk. The U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers titanium dioxide generally safe for use in food products, as does Health Canada. 

     

    What does titanium dioxide do to your body?

    Titanium dioxide is a common food additive used to provide color and texture in products such as candy, gum, toothpaste and sunscreen. In small amounts, it is not considered to be harmful. However, some studies have suggested that high doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles may cause cancer in animals. More research needs to be done before any definitive conclusions can be drawn.

     

    Why are they discontinuing Skittles?

    It is very unlikely that skittles will be discontinued altogether, but they will likely be re-introduced and manufactured in a way that does not include titanium dioxide. This is due to pending litigations and more evidence that ingredients may be harmful to the consumer. Consumer demands and the fact that many companies are striving to produce more natural, organic products also play a developing role in changes. The company has also recently announced plans to switch from artificial dyes to natural food colorings in their skittles candy.

     

    Are There Any Skittles Alternatives? 

    If you are still concerned about consuming foods containing titanium dioxide, there are some alternatives available on the market. For example, many manufacturers now offer organic versions of their products which contain natural ingredients instead of artificial dyes like those found in Skittles or M&Ms. Additionally, some companies have started using plant-based dyes such as beetroot powder or turmeric powder rather than artificial dyes derived from petroleum byproducts like titanium dioxide.  

     

     

    The recent report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has raised questions about whether food products containing titanium dioxide are potentially carcinogenic or not. While further research is needed to draw definitive conclusions about this issue, it's important to keep in mind that most experts agree that ingesting small amounts of titanium dioxide does not pose any significant health risk and is considered generally safe for use by both the FDA and Health Canada. If you are still concerned about consuming these types of food products then there are some alternatives available on the market such as organic versions or ones made with plant-based dyes like beetroot powder or turmeric powder instead of artificial dyes derived from petroleum byproducts like titanium dioxide.